Tomasz Domański: Middle Age
   

28 January – 13 March, 2011

Tomasz Domański: Middle Age
   

28 January – 13 March, 2011

Info

Tomasz Domanski - middle age

Opening: Friday, January 28th 2011 at 6 PM

Exhibition open through March 13th 2011

Curated by Piotr Krajewski

Tomasz Domański

Born in 1962 in Giżyck, Poland. As a dissident during the period of martial law (1980-82) he was arrested and imprisoned. He was granted temporary home leave for family reasons, at which point he simulated mental illness in order to avoid being sent back to prison or to the army; in the psychiatric hospital he did a series of photographic portraits of his fellow inmates. He studied at the State School of Fine Arts (now the Academy of Fine Arts) in Wrocław, where he majored in sculpture (studying under Prof. Leon Podsiadły; he graduated in 1993 and in 2003 he completed his doctorate.

Domański works in a range of media, creating sculptures, installations, performances, drawings and photos. He uses mainly natural materials – water, ice, fire, wood, straw, ash, metal – and the natural processes related to them: his works melt, drip, burn, succumb to gravity, etc. He also uses new media – video and digital technology – to make films and animations, which are an integral part of many of his works.

In 1995-96, during a residence at Banaras Hindu University in Varanasi, Domański travelled extensively around India and Nepal. His strong interest in the culture of those regions and their  concepts of time, of what is transient and what is lasting, had a major impact on his art. In 1997 he was nominated for Polityka weekly ‘s prestigious Passport Award for artistic achievements; that same year he represented Poland at the New Delhi Triennale. Domański has been awarded several grants from Poland’s Minister of Culture and National Heritage as well as many other institutions, including the Pollock-Krasner Foundation in New York, the Joseph Beuys Foundation in Basel, Montag Foundation Bildende Kunst in Bonn, the UNESCO-Aschberg Bursaries for Artists program and KulturKontakt in Vienna. He has held exhibitions and carried out projects in Poland, Germany, France, Luxembourg, Ireland, Norway, Sweden, the USA (including Alaska), Canada, China (in particular Hong Kong), Korea and elsewhere.

Tomasz Domański’s works are found worldwide, in the collections of such institutions as the Gruber Jez Foundation in Merida-Cholul, Mexico; the Nature Art Museum and Jang Gun Bong Nature Art Park in Gongju, Korea; Kronan Sculpture Park, Luleå, Sweden; Galerie v Přirodě, Hořice, Czech Republic; Norsk Bremuseum, Fjaerland, Norway; the Bernheim Collection, Clermont, Kentucky, USA; the municipal collection of Ma’alot, Israel; Skulpturenpark Katzow and Skulpturenpark Waren, Germany; Musèe de Sculpture Monumentale, Comblain-au-Pont, Belgium; and in Poland in the Polish Sculpture Center in Orońsk, the Lubuska Land Museum in Zielona Góra, the National Museum in Wrocław and the Lower Silesian Zachęta Fine Arts Association in Wrocław.

Middle age. Middle-age crisis. It’s like a teacher suddenly made me answer a lot of hard questions in front of the whole class, and I’m not prepared, but I don’t have any excuses – I knew I’d be called on to answer. So what’s the score, at this (optimistically speaking!) halfway point? How much have I let slide – how many projects have I neglected, how many where the bar was set too high? You could point out that I’ve fulfilled the old proverb: I’ve built house, planted a tree and I have a beautiful son … but I still feel uneasy. I don’t have the sense of certainty goes along with self-satisfaction. The only thing I know for sure is that it’s important to fight against routine, because it’s routine that destroys our curiosity – our sense of mystery, of some kind of surprise that’s worth taking a chance for. And the older a person gets, the harder it is to take chances. That’s why I treat middle age as a choice. It’s only now that I’m getting a sense of what risk is – an attractive uncertainty.

Tomasz Domański, December 2010/January 2011

Almost all the works being shown at the WRO Art Center are Tomasz Domański’s most recent installations, created specially for the Middle Age exhibition.

Quarrel [Spór], 2010
plaster, ash, bone glue, a mirror on a wooden base, steel
sound: recorded and remixed fragments of a quarrel between Elizabeth Taylor and Richard Burton
The incorporated film clips are from:
Cleopatra, directed by Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1963
Who’s Afraid of Virginia Woolf?, directed by Mike Nichols, 1966
The Taming of the Shrew, directed by Franco Zeffirelli, 1967

The Millstone of Time [Żarna czasu], 2010
steel, electric motor, fan, LCD TVs (x 2)
films:
x_ray_self_portrait, animation/loop 45:19 min, 2010
x_ray_stone_heart_self_portrait, animation/loop 46:58 min, 2010
sound: original compositions

The Return of the Man Called a Tree [Powrót człowieka zwanego drzewem], 2010
trees (x 3), steel cable, winch, motion/sound transformer, amplifier
films:
I’m More a Tree Than a Person I [Jestem bardziej drzewem niż człowiekiem I], 7:25 min, 2008
I’m More a Tree Than a Person II [Jestem bardziej drzewem niż człowiekiem II], 4:18 min, 2008
sound: original compositions

Mommydaddyandme [Mamatataija], 2009
animation, 4:43 min
sound: Swayambnunath, Kathmandu, Nepal 1995

Self-Portrait [Autoportret], 1985-2010 (dvd)
animation, 4:29 min
make-up: Marta Jarosz

Impasse [Impas] 2010
steel, ice, compressor
films:
She, 14:48 min, 2010
He,  18:42 min, 2010

Self-Portrait with Max [Autoportret z Maxem], 2010
plaster, wrapping paper, bone glue, steel, glass, projector
animation

O_O_B_E, 2010 (out of body experience)
polyurethane foam
film, 3:43 min

Linga, 2010
steel (gas cylinder), chain winch

Some observations from Adam Sobota, art critic, about TD’s recent work:

What interests Tomasz Domański is how people relate to nature, and to other people. His works tell us that individuals must constantly define ourselves in relation to phenomena that are unfolding in time, and which can be identified by their mutually interdependent elements. The power of nature and the objective inevitability of its rhythms have taught Domański lessons in humility, which he has expressed in numerous installations that include stone, ice, water, wax or fire. The duration of the works was determined by the processes of melting, burning and/or gravitation, and their meaning oscillated between demonstrations of impersonal processes and allustions to sacral symbolism (for example in the chapel made of ice in Alaska, where the audio was the regular sound of dripping water). Domański has done a performance and film entitled I Am More a Tree Than a Person [Jestem bardziej drzewem niż człowiekiem], in which he makes a piece of a tree trunk part of his identity, and shows that the steady transformations that take place in nature also affect the work of humans. Manmade products deteriorate; so does the human body; but they can be recycled as the raw material for new products. Many of Domański’s works involve this kind of idiosyncratic recycling – for example when he uses animal skeletons he’s found, or made pictures out of nail clippings or used tea bags.

Domański treats manmade mechanical and electronic items much the same way as he treats natural products. The way he uses them underscores the persistent repetitiveness of their functioning, and their helpless pursuit of their designers’ intentions. An example of this was his installation The Millenium Column [Kolumny Milenium] (2000), in which motorized concentric metal rings opened out and closed up like telescopes. Another example is his new installation The Millstone of Time [Żarna czasu], in which an engine sets metal wheels with attached monitors into motion. On the monitors you can see parts of a human body – one of the characteristic features of Domański’s recent work is the visualization of human forms and highlighting of human relationships. Figures of a man and woman who are linked by a glass coffin on their heads, or a table made of ice with ice chairs on either side, are clearly metaphors for barriers to mutual understanding or achieving the impossible. In films like Mommydaddyandme [Mamatataija] or Self-Portrait [Autoportret], on the other hand, a clear motif is the search for identity in the context of genealogy.

Tomasz Domański seems to treat relationships between people the same way he treats the forces of nature: They are based on set principles, they develop over time, in a way that goes beyond the limits of psychological interpretations. But perhaps the limits can’t be defined, due to the vast terrain of the unconscious. This idea is suggested by (for example) Domański’s installation Forest Movements According to Macbeth [Ruchy leśne według Makbeta], alluding to Shakespeare’s tragedy about the ambivalent nature of things. This installation is a highly characteristic example of the way Domański combines visual and conceptual stimuli to evoke a particular emotional state that serves to define the work.

Adam Sobota, January 2011

Tomasz Domański was born in 1962 in Giżyck, Poland. As a dissident during the period of martial law (1980-82) he was arrested and imprisoned. He was granted temporary home leave for family reasons, at which point he simulated mental illness in order to avoid being sent back to prison or to the army; in the psychiatric hospital he did a series of photographic portraits of his fellow inmates. He studied at the State School of Fine Arts (now the Academy of Fine Arts) in Wrocław, where he majored in sculpture (studying under Prof. Leon Podsiadły; he graduated in 1993 and in 2003 he completed his doctorate.

Domański works in a range of media, creating sculptures, installations, performances, drawings and photos. He uses mainly natural materials – water, ice, fire, wood, straw, ash, metal – and the natural processes related to them: his works melt, drip, burn, succumb to gravity, etc. He also uses new media – video and digital technology – to make films and animations, which are an integral part of many of his works.

In 1995-96, during a residence at Banaras Hindu University in Varanasi, Domański travelled extensively around India and Nepal. His strong interest in the culture of those regions and their  concepts of time, of what is transient and what is lasting, had a major impact on his art. In 1997 he was nominated for Polityka weekly ‘s prestigious Passport Award for artistic achievements; that same year he represented Poland at the New Delhi Triennale. Domański has been awarded several grants from Poland’s Minister of Culture and National Heritage as well as many other institutions, including the Pollock-Krasner Foundation in New York, the Joseph Beuys Foundation in Basel, the UNESCO-Aschberg Bursaries for Artists program and KulturKontakt in Vienna. He has held exhibitions and carried out projects in Poland, Germany, France, Luxembourg, Ireland, Norway, Sweden, the USA (including Alaska), Canada, China (in particular Hong Kong), Korea and elsewhere.

Tomasz Domański’s works are found worldwide, in the collections of such institutions as the Gruber Jez Foundation in Merida-Cholul, Mexico; the Nature Art Museum and Jang Gun Bong Nature Art Park in Gongju, Korea; Kronan Sculpture Park, Luleå, Sweden; Galerie v Přirodě, Hořice, Czech Republic; Norsk Bremuseum, Fjaerland, Norway; the Bernheim Collection, Clermont, Kentucky, USA; the municipal collection of Ma’alot, Israel; Skulpturenpark Katzow and Skulpturenpark Waren, Germany; Musèe de Sculpture Monumentale, Comblain-au-Pont, Belgium; and in Poland in the Polish Sculpture Center in Orońsk, the Lubuska Land Museum in Zielona Góra, the National Museum in Wrocław and the Lower Silesian Zachęta Fine Arts Association in Wrocław.

About the exhibition

(Polski) Tym, co zajmuje Tomasza Domańskiego, jest usytuowanie człowieka w obrębie natury i wobec innych ludzi. Jego dzieła mówią nam, że jednostka musi stale określać się wobec zjawisk, które rozwijają się w czasie i mogą być identyfikowane poprzez relacje współzależnych czynników. Potęga natury i obiektywna nieuchronność jej rytmów były dla artysty lekcją pokory, czemu dawał wyraz w licznych instalacjach z użyciem kamieni, lodu, wody, wosku czy ognia. Trwanie tych dzieł wyznaczane było przez procesy topnienia, spalania, zasadę grawitacji, a ich sens oscylował pomiędzy demonstracją bezosobowego procesu, a odwołaniami do sakralnej symboliki (jak w wypadku medytacyjnej kaplicy zbudowanej z lodu na Alasce, w której słyszalny był regularny odgłos kapiącej wody). Artysta zrealizował nawet performance i film pt. Jestem bardziej drzewem niż człowiekiem, gdzie jednoczy się z fragmentem pnia drzewa. Zarazem wskazywał, że nieustanne przemiany dokonujące się w naturze dotyczą też tego, co jest dziełem ludzi. Wytwory człowieka i samo jego ciało niszczeją, ale mogą być użyte ponownie jako surowiec dla nowych dzieł. Wiele prac Tomasza Domańskiego powstało w ramach swoistego recyklingu, np. przez użycie znalezionych szkieletów zwierząt albo tworzenie obrazów z obciętych paznokci czy zużytych torebek herbaty.

Produkty ludzkie z dziedziny mechaniki i elektroniki artysta traktuje podobnie jak wytwory natury. Używa ich w ten sposób, że podkreśla uporczywą powtarzalność ich funkcji i bezwładne odzwierciedlanie pierwotnej intencji. Tak było z instalacją Kolumny Milenium z 2000 roku, gdzie metalowe pierścienie poruszane silnikami teleskopowo wysuwały i chowały swoje części. Podobnie jest w aktualnej instalacji Żarna czasu, gdzie silnik wprawia w ruch metalowe koła z przymocowanymi do nich monitorami. Na monitorach uwidocznione są części ludzkiego ciała i jest to – charakterystyczne dla najnowszych prac Tomasza Domańskiego – dążenie do wizualizacji postaci człowieka, czyli akcentowanie relacji międzyludzkich. Figury kobiety i mężczyzny, które połączone są przez nałożoną na ich głowy szklaną trumnę, albo też stół z lodowym blatem i krzesłami po obu stronach, ewidentnie kojarzą się z barierami w porozumiewaniu się, które wymagają „stopienia lodów” czy „zdobycia szklanej góry”. Z drugiej strony ewidentnym motywem takich filmowych realizacji, jak Mamatataija czy Autoportret jest poszukiwanie tożsamości w kontekście genealogii.

Wydaje się, że Tomasz Domański związki pomiędzy ludźmi traktuje podobnie jak żywioły natury; są one oparte na określonych regułach oraz rozwijają się w czasie i trybie, który wkracza poza granice ich psychologicznej interpretacji. Być może jednak nie da się określić tych granic z powodu istnienia rozległego obszaru nieświadomości. Myśl taką nasuwa np. instalacja Ruchy leśne według Makbeta, która odwołuje się do sławnego literackiego wzorca mówiącego o niejednoznacznym charakterze zjawisk. To typowy przykład sposobu, w jaki artysta zestawia bodźce wizualne i pojęciowe, aby uzyskać określony stan emocjonalny, który ma zarazem funkcję definiującą.

Adam Sobota, styczeń 2011

Works

(Polski) Spór, 2010
gips, popiół, klej kostny, lustro na konstrukcji drewnianej, stal, głośniki
dźwięk: nagrane i zmiksowane fragmenty kłótni Elizabeth Taylor i Richarda Burtona pochodzące z klasycznych filmów hollywoodzkich Kleopatra (reż. Joseph L. Mankiewicz, 1963), Kto się boi Wirginii Woolf? (reż. Mike Nichols, 1966) i Poskromienie złośnicy (reż. Franco Zeffirelli, 1967)

Żarna czasu, 2010
stal, silnik elektryczny, dmuchawa, monitory LCD
video:
x_ray_self_portrait, animacja/pętla, 45:19 min, 2010
x_ray_stone_heart_self_portrait, animacja/pętla, 46:58 min, 2010
dźwięk: kompozycje własne

Powrót człowieka zwanego drzewem, 2010
drzewa (x 3), linka stalowa, wyciągarka,  transformator ruchu, wzmacniacz audio
video:
Jestem bardziej drzewem niż człowiekiem I, 7:25 min, 2008
Jestem bardziej drzewem niż człowiekiem II, 4:18 min, 2008
dźwięk: kompozycje własne

Mamatataija, 2009
animacja, 4:43 min
dźwięk: Swayambnunath, Kathmandu, Nepal 1995

Autoportret, 1985-2010
animacja, 4:29 min
charakteryzacja: Marta Jarosz

Impas, 2010
stal, lód, kompresor
wideo:
Ona, 14:48 min, 2010
On,  18:42 min, 2010

Autoportret z Maxem, 2010
gips, papier pakowy, klej kostny, stal, szkło, video

O_O_B_E, 2010 (out of body experience)
figura z pianki poliuretanowej
film dvd, 3:43 min

Linga, 2010
stal (butla gazowa), wyciągarka łańcuchowa

About the artist

(Polski) Tomasz Domański

Urodził się w 1962 r. w Giżycku. Za działalność opozycyjną w stanie wojennym aresztowany i skazany, by nie wrócić do więzienia i uniknąć wojska w czasie przerwy w karze symulował zaburzenia umysłowe; w szpitalu psychiatrycznym zrealizował serię portretów fotograficznych współmieszkańców. Studiował na PWSSP (obecnie ASP) we Wrocławiu, gdzie w 1993 r. uzyskał dyplom z rzeźby (w pracowni prof. Leona Podsiadłego), a w 2003 r. obronił doktorat. Jest autorem rzeźb, instalacji, obiektów, performansów, rysunków i fotografii. Pracuje przeważnie z naturalnymi materiałami: wodą, lodem, ogniem, drewnem, słomą, popiołem, metalem, wykorzystując właściwe im procesy. Sięga po nowe media – wideo i techniki cyfrowe – tworząc filmy i animacje jako integralne elementy wielu swoich realizacji.

W latach 1995-96, w czasie stażu na Banaras Hindu University w Varanasi, odbył liczne podróże po Indiach i Nepalu. Fascynacja tamtejszą kulturą, odmiennością traktowania pojęć czasu, przemijania i trwałości, wywarła duży wpływ na jego sztukę. W 1997 r. nominowany do Paszportów „Polityki”, w tym samym roku reprezentował Polskę na IX Triennale Sztuki w New Delhi. Wielokrotny stypendysta Ministra Kultury i Dziedzictwa Narodowego oraz wielu fundacji i instytucji, m.in. Pollock-Krasner z Nowego Jorku, Josepha Beuysa z Bazylei, Montag Stiftung Bildende Kunst z Bonn, UNESCO-Aschberg czy KulturKontakt z Wiednia. Swoje projekty i wystawy realizował m.in. w Polsce, Niemczech, Francji, Luksemburgu, Irlandii, Norwegii, Szwecji, USA, Kanadzie, na Alasce, w Hong Kongu czy Korei.

Prace Tomasza Domańskiego znajdują się m.in. w kolekcjach takich instytucji, jak Gruber Jez Foundation Merida-Cholul, Meksyk; Nature Art Museum oraz Jang Gun Bong Nature Art Park, Gongju, Korea; Kronan Sculpture Park, Luleå, Szwecja; Galerie v Přirodě, Hořice, Czechy; Norsk Bremuseum, Fjaerland, Norwegia; Kolekcja Bernheim, Clermont, USA; Kolekcja Miejska, Ma’alot, Izrael; Skulpturenpark Katzow oraz Skulpturenpark Waren, Niemcy; Musèe de Sculpture Monumentale, Comblain-au-Pont, Belgia; Centrum Rzeźby Polskiej w Orońsku, Muzeum Ziemi Lubuskiej w Zielonej Górze, Muzeum Narodowe we Wrocławiu i Dolnośląskie Towarzystwo Zachęty Sztuk Pięknych we Wrocławiu.